Archive for the ‘Marketing 2.0’ Category

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Effective Social Media Communications – 3 Tips For Friday!

July 3, 2015

I am riding in the car today with my 16 year old daughter.   She was looking for a specific song on the radio.  While constantly switching stations she was listening carefully but selectively scanning out the ‘wrong’ songs.  Station after station was rejected until she heard the familiar song she was seeking.

This experience made me think of social media communications.   How do you break through all the other “stations” out there and have your audience search for yours?

Here’s 3 tips for our Friday!

  • Make it noticeable.  The song my daughter was searching for had a certain beat.  Does your message have the characteristics that will help it to break through the barrage of messages that bombards everyone every day.   Should you use video?  a Podcast or a blog?   How do you express yourself?  Make sure you have listened to the right influencers and plan purposefully the message.
  • Make it targeted.   If you use channels creatively and mix them well, you’re much more likely to get your message to those for whom it’s intended. The channels have to be ones that your target audience is exposed to.  My daughter’s song was on her favorite rock station, not my jazz station.   Make sure you are where your audience is.
  • Make it crowd sourced.   Testing your messaging can help you really ensure that you nailed it.  I heard that Taylor Swift gets many bits of feedback on her songs from focus groups, family, and informally with fans.  Sometimes you think you got it, but you missed something of importance!

 

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3 Things I have learned from my daughters about Disruption and Social

June 4, 2015

Yes, my 2 daughters have shared with me

  1. Dude Perfect.   There are 5 guys who were friends at Texas (and a Panda) that have a cool and fun YouTube channel.   They started with basketball tricks and earned “endorsements” from their videos.   Now they do comedy like sterotypes and more sports tricks. Now they have added games, books, and more.    What I learned:  My daughters love the quirky video fun and can’t wait for the next episodes.  Their use of social is amazing and they have taken their passion and used it as a great example of the power of social and passion!
  2. Augmented reality (AR) art.   My daughters recently showed me 2 postcards with art on them that came alive with a small AR app on my phone.  Simply put — wow!  The art came alive with flames that were painted and then on the phone it was real!    What I learned:  The world is changing to such a visual experience.   My daughters expect an experience — whether it is AR or IoT sensors embedded to create an experience.  A good lesson to learn and experiment with!
  3. They want our help.   My daughters showed me today this note that a mom wrote to her son’s facebook friends.  They wanted to chat on it but it was interesting that they “liked” reluctantly what the mom had done.  What I learned:  Kids do like help on social.  My daughters AHA moment was her telling me that the accountability I have with her on Instagram helps her maintain “her” standards.   

 

 

 

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Digital Marketing Comes of Age

May 27, 2015

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Predictive Cloud Computing is REAL! Franz Edelman Award Finalist – team IBM!

April 13, 2015

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Make it real — Influencers need to be authentic!!!

April 8, 2015

From #SMMW15, I loved Douglas Karr , the President and CEO of DK New Media, and his examples of powerful Influencer Marketing.

Authenticity is when your voice and input are helpful, real, verifiable and meaningful,  A simple example of the power of authenticity is a viral video hero!

The Authentic Rap

Did you catch the YouTube video that a husband filmed his wife in a very authenticate set of moves, as she raps to a song in the car.  It has about 18M views to date.   And the song playing by Salt and Pepper received another 500K downloads through the Ellen Show.

The Brand “takes over”:

Acura asked this “YouTube” star to do a commercial for them with their rap.   I still like the rap in their new commercial — but it only racked up 172K views on YouTube “Drive like a boss”.  Why?  It was not as authentic because of the heavy branding.

Why?

The second video is very branded, and not as authentic.   The big question is how do you leverage an influencer in an authentic way?

Doug’s 3 top pieces of advice:

1. Leverage influencers that have an audience that matches your audience.

2. Find influencers who are willing to share the story with their audience.

3. Measure the impact of the influencer

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A New Way to Work! Email + Social = WOW!

April 6, 2015

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The Expectations you set can change your “quest” for success! Community or Crowd

March 31, 2015

The other day my daughter came home with 2 different grades.  On one paper, she received a 97 and was upset that she didn’t get a 100.  On the other she got a 87 — a “B+” — and was satisfied because this was a ‘hard’ class and subject.

I thought about her reaction and ours to these types of situations as well.

Are you expecting success from your social work?  Are you expecting a crowd or a community?

As I talk to companies around the world, the big question that I get is: “What is the difference between just a group of people – a crowd and a community?”  Sometimes the question is “How do I get a group of people to become a community, and see value in the community itself?

This question has fascinated me for a while as I myself have built communities, and have been in learn mode as well from others researching the power of a community, taking classes, reading everything I can get my hands on, and talking to lots of clients who have been successful!

My conclusions for building a great community vs just a crowd, are below.  But in all cases you need to expect great things from working with your community!

  1. Leadership vs. Equality. The best communities have strong Community Managers who provide leadership and direction for the group. They help establish the goal of the community experience and define the business problems trying to be solved. They help develop and shape the community norm, start conversations, and listen. They attract and build the right content, stories, and subject matter expertise.. Crowds have no leadership that is stable.   As such, they struggle with a defined direction and so wander and lose focus. CEMEX, the world’s largest building materials supplier, has leadership not just from a community manager, but their leadership is all the way at the very top, their CEO.
  1. Purpose vs. Pride. A Community is motivated by purpose. They share a goal. For instance, Dogster, the number one community for dog lovers, is driven by the love of dogs. The community states “this vibrant community is a must for any dog enthusiast!” Crowds are run by Pride. Sometimes pride of ownership not purpose.
  2. Engaged vs. Sporadic. A community is engaged in active discussions and sharing.  They comment, debate, and share expertise. They are consistent and responsive. For example, the DeveloperWorks community, is very engaged even though they have over 4 million members. They engage though member driven topics on technology. The engagement is driven by trust in open and transparent discussion (this is what works, this doesn’t) and by perceived value. IBM has experts that are passionate about providing the best support in the industry. With the right people in the community, the value based engagement shines through as the members become community champions – internally and externally. Crowds are in and out of discussions in a sporadic way.   They are not committed to the discussions but pepper themselves in and out of the discussions.
  3. Belong vs. Benefit. A community is powered by belonging so that they can influence. The satisfaction that they get from the community is partially that they are part of something bigger. For instance, the China Deaf Association has a community that centers around providing real-time, online sign-language interpretation to improve the lives of deaf and hearing-impaired people. This 200K member community is driven by belonging to a community of people like them. Crowds wants benefits – or rewards. Crowds like to get; Communities like to give.
  4. Collaboration vs. Connection. The best communities collaborate as a normal working style.   They feel the value exists with more input and a diversity of debate. For example, Pepsi, a large global consumer products company, has their community focused on accelerating development and project pipelines for innovations and new products. Product innovations increase as people collaborate through discovery and expertise. Crowds want connection; Communities believe in the collective brain!

Numbers of members are not the key metric and does not equal a strong community. A Crowd Mentality is driven by the broad set of people that you have access to, not a relationship with.   A community is about having passionate members that belong!

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